The Future Firefighter Podcast

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Dr. Kellie O'Dare and Blake Richardson

Dr. Kellie O'Dare and Blake Richardson
Host Chris Baker speaks with guests Dr. Kellie O'Dare, Co-Director of the 2nd Alarm Project, and Blake Richardson, Co-Founder of EaseAlert. They discuss why sleep is mission critical in the fire service, and touch on various topics including firefighter health and wellness, behavioral health resources, and the value of peer support for the fut...
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Deputy Chief Joe Powers

Deputy Chief Joe Powers
Join host Chris Baker and guest Deputy Chief Joe Powers as they discuss embracing career opportunities, cultivating positive relationships, and building sustainability in the fire service. During this episode, they also discuss the Vision 20/20 Project and the value of community risk reduction through risk assessments, establishing partnerships and...
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Assistant Chief Todd LeDuc

Assistant Chief Todd LeDuc
Join host Christopher Baker with guest Assistant Chief (Ret.) Todd LeDuc as they discuss his new book titled Surviving the Fire Service, published by Fire Engineering Books & Videos. This episode will focus on how the future firefighter can manage and reduce risks throughout their careers in the fire service.  Listen to this Episode https:...
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How to Become a Firefighter for the Los Angeles City Fire Department

How to Become a Firefighter for the Los Angeles City Fire Department
"The Future Firefighter" host Chris Baker talks LAFD recruitment with City of Los Angeles Fire Department Captain Rick Najera. Listen to this Episode https://www.blogtalkradio.com/fireengineeringpodcast/2020/02/04/how-to-become-a-firefighter-for-the-los-angeles-city-fire-department Podcast: How to Become a Firefighter for the Los Angeles City Fire ...
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Captain Justin Schorr

Captain Justin Schorr

 “Argue for your limitations, and sure enough, they’re yours.”

– Richard Bach

In this episode, Chris Baker sits down with Rescue Captain, Justin Schorr, "the Happy Medic" to talk about what he's learned over the last 25 years in the fire service and why one of the worst pieces of advice is "get your Medic." While obtaining the license will get you on a smaller list when hired, there's a catch, they want you to work as a medic when you get hired.  Find out more about what EMS means to the Future Firefighter and listen to this episode.

"Should every Future Firefighter become a Paramedic?  In one word, Yes.  EMS is the future of the Modern Fire Service so each candidate should have a grasp on their place in the system as they get hired.  Paramedicine isn't for everyone. There's a lot of stress involved in not only obtaining the license, but maintaining it and, of course, being responsible for the care of your patients." (Schorr)

"When you get hired as a Paramedic, here's a hint...they need you as a Paramedic." (Schorr)

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Job Search Resources

Job Search Resources

The days of filling out applications on paper are obsolete and now several agencies have utilized technology to expedite their application process. One helpful tip is to save your information in a word document and you can cut/paste this information into these online career websites when you are creating your profile. Review the job announcement and job description specifically the information related to the job performance review standards (JPR’s) and the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA’s) for each position. Only apply for positions that you meet the minimum requirements in the job announcement. If you have any doubts and or questions, contact the hiring official for each specific agency to clarify these questions regarding the minimum requirements. Make sure you have a keen eye for attention to detail. Several of these items are highlighted in both the job announcement and the specific job description for each position. Remember this is a test and the test is simple; can you follow written directions. If you want this highly desirable position in the fire service, you have to first apply.

 

Job Search Resources

CalOpps

https://www.calopps.org/

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Dr. Harry Carter

Fire Engineering Radio: The Future Firefighter Podcast with Dr. Harry Carter Fire Engineering Radio: The Future Firefighter Podcast with Dr. Harry Carter

 

Live from FDIC 2018: Day Five

The Value of Education in the Fire Service

 

“I have achieved a great deal in life through education.”– Dr. Harry R. Carter

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The Future Firefighter Podcast: Building the Unbreakable Future Firefighter

The Future Firefighter Podcast: Building the Unbreakable Future Firefighter

 

“If you quit you will regret it for the rest of your life. Quitting never makes things easier.” – Admiral William H. McRaven

 

ENTRY LEVEL FIREFIGHTER HIRING PROCESS

 

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Leading Throughout Probation and Beyond in the Fire Service: Part 2

Leading Throughout Probation and Beyond in the Fire Service: Part 2 Leading Throughout Probation and Beyond in the Fire Service: Part 2

You have survived the first week as a probationary firefighter in the best career in the world. You might need to pinch yourself because you possibly feel like you just won the lottery. The first week undoubtedly went by so fast, that it feels like a blur and you are still in the process of trying to find out how you will “fit-in” to the firehouse culture. The last article covered the roles, responsibilities, and duties of being a probationary firefighter. This article is going to focus on the character traits that are necessary to pass the probationary period and these traits will also make a major contribution in building important relationships in the firehouse.

 

It is very important to have your own unique morals, values, and ethics prior to gaining entry into the fire service. These traits are the reference point for anyone seeking a career in this field. It is those same traits that you will need to harness and rely upon while leading throughout probation. Always do the right thing. Do not participate in any activity that is illegal, immoral or unethical on or off duty in your fire service career - period. The impact of violating these values will be catastrophic for your fire service career.

 

The probationary period allows you the opportunity to display your own personal character traits. It is during this time that you will want to listen more than you speak. Let your actions speak for themselves around the firehouse.   Everything you touch is an opportunity for you to leave your own unique set of fingerprints. Actions speak louder than words. Keep your head down and your nose to the grindstone while you earn this position. Be effective and efficient with your time while on duty. With every action is an opportunity for you to make an investment into the department and your fire service career. Always remember you were hired as a public servant. Accept this title with enthusiasm and humility.

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Leading Throughout Probation and Beyond in the Fire Service

Leading Throughout Probation and Beyond in the Fire Service Leading Throughout Probation and Beyond in the Fire Service

From our first day in the fire service, we have the opportunity to be a leader and lead throughout probation and well beyond, until long after our retirement.  This article is not the perfect recipe or golden ticket to pass probation.  It takes more than a list of rules to be successful in passing probation.  Ultimately, the responsibility of passing the probationary period rests firmly on the probationary firefighter's shoulders.

 

On our first day, as we embark upon this prized career in the fire service, it is necessary to show up and arrive early to the fire station.  Early is comprised of at least 60 minutes prior to the start of our shift.  Several tasks are essential and required to be completed before we can officially start the day on “Big Red” in the Jumpseat.  Don’t be late in this profession!  You will be left behind at the station if you are late, and more importantly, you don’t get a 2nd chance for a 1st impression!

 

Someone has to raise the American flag.   This is an opportunity for the probationary firefighter to take responsibility for raising Old Glory for the community we have the honor to serve.  It takes leadership from the probationary firefighter to raise the flag.  No one is going to issue this order because this is our responsibility.  It is also our responsibility to lower the flag and properly fold the flag in the evening.  Learn proper flag etiquette and take leadership in learning how to honor the American flag.

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Why I Became a Public Safety Servant

Why I Became a Public Safety Servant

I will never forget the day I signed up to be a volunteer firefighter for my community. In 2005, I can recall watching the devastation on TV from the natural disaster Hurricane Katrina and Rita in the Gulf Region of the United States. I felt like I needed to help in some form or fashion; I wanted to do something. At the time, in my local area of California, I visited my local volunteer fire station and signed up to become a volunteer firefighter. I didn't know that I would soon be embarking on my future career in the Fire Service.

I attended training on Wednesday evenings and weekends for eight months at the firehouse. I graduated from my department's firefighter basics program and became an official probationary firefighter. I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of every training class in the basic firefighter program over those eight months. I consumed and digested every piece of information regarding the fire service. I read every magazine on the coffee table at the firehouse at least three times from cover to cover over my first year. I even asked the senior firefighters at my station to take home the old magazines to glean the valuable information they contained.  I became a student of the fire service. Over the next year following the department-sponsored training program, I attended various emergency medical and fire service-related training classes.

I will never forget my first call some ten years ago as a volunteer firefighter. After that first call, I realized that I wanted to do this for the rest of my career. I approached the crossroads of my life, and I had to make an important decision. I wanted to become a public servant. I wanted to help my community. In December of 2006, I served my first paid shift as a reserve firefighter. And in my first year, I signed up for a total of 96 - 24-hour shifts at the firehouse, in addition to my regular full-time day job position.

Why should you become a public servant? Do you feel the desire to help your fellow neighbor in their time of need? Have you ever had a bad day and needed to call 911 for help? I am sure everyone reading this article has requested the aid of a public safety servant. I have always been thankful for the Good Samaritan that has assisted my family members in those difficult times. Are you interested in pursuing a career in the fire service? If so, stop by your local firehouse and ask your local firefighters in your community, "why they became a public safety servant?" I am positive they would be more than willing to help you with any questions you might have.

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Are you a Change Magnet?

Are you a Change Magnet?

Do you embrace change or do you resist it?  Do you approach a conversation with an open mind or do you approach the discussion with a closed mind?  Are you willing to accept technological advances or discredit them?  Are you willing to pull up a chair at the table and join the conversation?

I am a humble public servant.  My ultimate goal and purpose, in my position in the fire service, is to serve the public.  Our customers expect a highly competent professional that will arrive in an effective and efficient manner to mitigate their emergency.  Are you willing to be a change magnet?

The fire service is rapidly approaching the age of discovery in the realm of scientific information.  This scientific data is at the forefront of many conversations and discussions around the firehouse kitchen table.  The application of this scientific data is very difficult to apply, digest and even comprehend.  Are you willing to embrace this information?

In this age of discovery, this scientific information is highlighting information that has already been discovered in the past.  However, in this current age of information, several are reconsidering this preexisting information.  This age of technology is integrated with almost every aspect of the society of today.  For example, smartphones, smart televisions and now even smart refrigerators.  You can see this advancement of technology by attending national fire/ems conferences and walking the exposition floor.  Are you willing to attend these conferences and become familiar with the advancement of this technology in the fire service?

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